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So here is a post!

Okay, so I wrote that, then immediately got up to get another sloppy joe because I couldn't think of anything else to write. I don't remember being so bad at this!

Okay, here's a thing that's going on in my life: so some of you may remember that I'm in optometry school, and some of you may remember that last winter I failed Ocular Pharmacology, which meant that I had to repeat the course—and, since the course is only offered once a year, it meant I had to basically drop out for the spring and summer, get a job for that time, and then come back to join the class under me to retake the course.

WELL. I am DELIGHTED to say that it is going much, much better this year. Grades have been As and Bs and I'm even getting handwritten notes on the results pages (Good job this term! Keep it up!), which I figure can't be that bad. The instructor even told me that I seemed more engaged in lecture this year, which, considering I was so frustrated and embarrassed by my own difficulty in the course last year that I went out of my way to actively avoid the professor, I can totally see why she'd think that.

BUT it's going so much better now, and God willing I'll do as well on the last test and the final, and this time next year I'll be prepping for externship rotations rather than this class again, because if that happens I might seriously consider throwing myself off the ledge in front of my apartment. (It is about three feet high. In retrospect, this is not a particularly effective threat.)


This is a very cute story for people who like either proposals or Star Trek.


Goodness, what else is going on? Auburn football has been absolutely atrocious this year but nobody cares about that on my flist but me, I don't think. The dog has hit 65 pounds and seems to be leveling off there, and all 65 pounds of him are currently on my feet.

AH AH AH HERE IS A FUNNY THING THAT HAPPENED.

So, we had a test Monday which included a short-answer section, and one of the questions was "Explain how ortho K is beneficial for a young myope." And oh my goodness, I had no idea. I remembered the phrase popping up on the Alternative Treatment slide but we never went into it in any depth that I remembered, and I've never met an optometrist who has even suggested it as a possible treatment for myopia, so I couldn't even attempt the b.s. the question. So, in the spirit of total honesty, I wrote down in the black "not the foggiest idea," went on to answer the rest of the questions, and that was that.

The next day, in lab, I had a question for one of the professors who teaches the course. She's a very nice woman but very serious and very professional, and I've never really heard her joke around with students or even with the other professors save a few comments here and there. So I asked my question about the vergence testing we were doing that day and she looked at me, and she kind of shrugged one shoulder, and she said, "Well, Quark, I haven't the foggiest idea."

And then she winked at me.

Oh my goodness, I died laughing. She said it made her laugh as well when she was looking over the exams the previous night, and it was just such a great moment that I proceeded to tell all my friends it had happened too (to their own varying degrees of shock and laughter). It was also pretty cool to see her smile that broadly in a classroom setting.


Also, I am now on Dreamwidth? LoquaciousQuark over there too, as per usual. I'm planning on crossposting everything to LJ too though, so those of y'all here won't notice any difference.


Okay, one last thing that I should have mentioned ages ago and...utterly failed to: Jade is here! She moved in quite a number of days ago and I am just the worst at telling y'all things, but I can at least tell you that it's been great. I don't think Jade will be mad at me for confiding that I was a slight bit nervous about it, just because we haven't lived in the same city for like five years and I am not so good at the reliable social interactions when it jeopardizes my precious precious sleep times, but to my utter and unending relief it has been wonderful.

Like, I'd forgotten how nice it is to just sit down and talk with someone about anything and everything that comes into your head. My roommate I adore and love and treasure dearly, but she has no fandom background and she just doesn't understand the giddy joy of posting a fic and getting positive feedback like someone who's been there and done it themselves. I mean, the other day we sat at my kitchen table and discussed Dragon Age minutiae for like three hours. We're talking the nature of demons, Inquisition possibilities, everything about the Old Gods the wiki had to offer.

It's just fun, you know? I'd forgotten how much fun it could be.
loquaciousquark: ((misc) eyes! eyes everywhere!)
16th-Aug-2012 04:14 am - FLASH!! BOOM! ZING!!
Why am I so bad at this LJ thing?

I don't know. I have a ton of stuff to talk about--I finished my summer-not-really-summer-more-like-March-to-August-that's-what-five-months job a little over a week ago and classes start next Monday (OH BOY I GET TO GO THROUGH PHARM ALL OVER AGAIN)(also the first bits of CEVS)(which is going to be simultaneously hilarious and awful)(because I'm going to have to sit through someone taking 45 minutes an eye on retinoscopy on me when I've already passed the practical where we had six minutes for both eyes)(but at least I don't have to take the tests for that one). I also helped my little brother move into his new house which will be his First Married House (October 13. Oh my goodness my little brother is getting married).

BUT what I actually want to talk about tonight is the fact that I am experiencing my very first Ocular Migraine (tm)!

There was a small little shimmering spot in both eyes just to the right of my central vision for about 15 minutes, which made it very awkward to read XKCD, and then slowly it expanded into a large shimmering backwards C that was always dancing just out of sight, which as you may guess is very frustrating when you're trying to document the appearance of visual phenomena for science.

THEN it got bigger and bigger and bigger and eventually took up my whole dextro visual field and there were SPARKS and BLUE AND RED FLASHING LIGHTS and little wavy LIGHTNING BOLTS and now the headache's started which is less fun but at least I have my regular migraine medication for that.

But mostly I was inspired by my across-the-street neighbor whose kids I played with for years growing up and who I recently found out is also an optometrist. (Go figure.) He has a blog which is very often very funny, but he recently documented his own retinal tear which I found absolutely FASCINATING, and I would would recommend the read just for the articulateness of it.

Oh, oh, oh, my head my head my head. GOING TO BED.

(This also reminds me of the patient we had one day who, upon learning I was in optometry school, said, "Oh, what's the difference between optometrists and ophthalmologists again? They're the smart ones, right?" And when she realized what she'd said, back-tracked by saying, "I mean, they're the ones who are real doctors?"

Which, considering I've heard an ophthalmologist describe optometrists as "monkeys with glass cutters," is not the most insulting thing she could have said, I guess.)
loquaciousquark: ((misc) eyes! eyes everywhere!)
16th-Aug-2012 04:14 am - FLASH!! BOOM! ZING!!
Why am I so bad at this LJ thing?

I don't know. I have a ton of stuff to talk about--I finished my summer-not-really-summer-more-like-March-to-August-that's-what-five-months job a little over a week ago and classes start next Monday (OH BOY I GET TO GO THROUGH PHARM ALL OVER AGAIN)(also the first bits of CEVS)(which is going to be simultaneously hilarious and awful)(because I'm going to have to sit through someone taking 45 minutes an eye on retinoscopy on me when I've already passed the practical where we had six minutes for both eyes)(but at least I don't have to take the tests for that one). I also helped my little brother move into his new house which will be his First Married House (October 13. Oh my goodness my little brother is getting married).

BUT what I actually want to talk about tonight is the fact that I am experiencing my very first Ocular Migraine (tm)!

There was a small little shimmering spot in both eyes just to the right of my central vision for about 15 minutes, which made it very awkward to read XKCD, and then slowly it expanded into a large shimmering backwards C that was always dancing just out of sight, which as you may guess is very frustrating when you're trying to document the appearance of visual phenomena for science.

THEN it got bigger and bigger and bigger and eventually took up my whole dextro visual field and there were SPARKS and BLUE AND RED FLASHING LIGHTS and little wavy LIGHTNING BOLTS and now the headache's started which is less fun but at least I have my regular migraine medication for that.

But mostly I was inspired by my across-the-street neighbor whose kids I played with for years growing up and who I recently found out is also an optometrist. (Go figure.) He has a blog which is very often very funny, but he recently documented his own retinal tear which I found absolutely FASCINATING, and I would would recommend the read just for the articulateness of it.

Oh, oh, oh, my head my head my head. GOING TO BED.

(This also reminds me of the patient we had one day who, upon learning I was in optometry school, said, "Oh, what's the difference between optometrists and ophthalmologists again? They're the smart ones, right?" And when she realized what she'd said, back-tracked by saying, "I mean, they're the ones who are real doctors?"

Which, considering I've heard an ophthalmologist describe optometrists as "monkeys with glass cutters," is not the most insulting thing she could have said, I guess.)
loquaciousquark: ((misc) eyes! eyes everywhere!)
15th-Mar-2012 05:34 pm - BAM emPLOYMENT!
HEY.

GUESS WHO HAS TWO THUMBS AND IS EMPLOYED AT (ANOTHER) EYECARE ASSOCIATES.



loquaciousquark: ((misc) eyes! eyes everywhere!)
15th-Mar-2012 05:34 pm - BAM emPLOYMENT!
HEY.

GUESS WHO HAS TWO THUMBS AND IS EMPLOYED AT (ANOTHER) EYECARE ASSOCIATES.



loquaciousquark: ((misc) eyes! eyes everywhere!)
Also, I lol every single time I see this picture. This is what happens when you only practice on one eye after class. Plus, one of the lenses popped out of my cheapo readers this morning, and man if it wasn't the right one for the job. Quark, turning misfortune into GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY.


loquaciousquark: ((misc) eyes! eyes everywhere!)
Also, I lol every single time I see this picture. This is what happens when you only practice on one eye after class. Plus, one of the lenses popped out of my cheapo readers this morning, and man if it wasn't the right one for the job. Quark, turning misfortune into GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY.


loquaciousquark: ((misc) eyes! eyes everywhere!)
I am cyclopleged!

I feel like this is worthy of notice because it's the only time they're going to do it to us while we're in school, and if they've decided that even as frequently as they dilate us that we only have to suffer cycloplegia once, then it's probably severe enough in its effects that it won't be a standard practice in an office. Plus, the sensation of being dilated is still enough of a novelty to me that I still find it entertaining to lose my near vision and have to wear reading glasses, although the sensitivity to light is a bum rap no matter how you play it. What. That is a perfectly reasonable metaphor. Shut up.

But all the same, this sucker is strong. Cycloplegia is basically a very strong, very long-acting dilator. It involves four different drops in each eye and it's designed to knock out all of a patient's accommodation for a long time, not just the little bit that regular dilation in an office does. The mix we used today was 1% cyclopentolate, 1% tropicamide, and 2.5% phenyl (the fourth drop was an anesthetic).

Anyway, the purpose, as stated, is to knock out all accommodation. This is mostly used for diagnosing little kids with really strong hyperopia. They're far-sighted, but their accommodation system can bring in their focus to the thing they're looking at, so the parents and the kids think they're seeing okay. But the problem is that their accommodation is having to work so hard to bring that focus in that they get horrible headaches and eye strain and burning, and sometimes their accommodation can even freeze up and they physically can't relax it, so we use the cycloplegia to knock out alllll that accommodation to see what they're actually seeing.

(One of the professors showed a slide in class today of a kid who got +0.25D OU on subjective refraction, which is a hyperopia so faint that it's almost nonexistent. But then, when the kid was cyclopleged and his accommodation was knocked out, the clinician discovered almost +4.50D latent hyperopia. FOUR FIFTY. THAT POOR KID.)

So our lab today was on cycloplegia. I was dropped at 9:50 this morning, and it's...almost six hours later, and my accommodation is juuuuust starting to come back so I can read at near distances. When I was first dropped, I lost my near vision up to four feet. Luckily, I'm just a high myope, so with my glasses I could still see distance and with the readers I could still manage to fill out my lab sheet. There were a couple unfortunate souls in my lab group who were latent hyperopes, and God bless them but they lost everything. One girl had to have her husband come pick her up because she couldn't drive.

And the thing about cycloplegia is that it lasts. so. long. The accommodation is usually busted for 8-12 hours, though it can last longer, and the dilation part of it lasts from 12-24 hours. THAT'S A DAY. A FULL DAY OF BEING DILATED. I drove home with two pairs of sunglasses and my readers on my nose and it still wasn't dark enough. (Although I will not lie, it was pretty hilarious to go down the pre-clinic rooms and see all these young people with reading glasses perched on the ends of their noses.)

And can I just say--these drops taste SO BAD? THEY TASTE SO BAD, YOU GUYS. I even did the whole nasolacrimal occlusion thing and it STILL ran down the back of my throat, and oh my goodness, ew. Now I feel even worse I dropped so much Fluress in one of my classmate's faces, because this stuff...it tastes disgusting.

Okay I just checked in the mirror and my pupils are blown so wide I look high. This explains why I got looks at the restaurant at lunch. (Okay, a 20-something fiddling with +2.50 readers to read the menu might have also been part of it.)(JADE WE WENT TO SALVATORE'S. I THOUGHT OF YOU.) Plus I think at that point I had my distance glasses and both pairs of sunglasses on my head, so. Huh. Things to consider in retrospect, I guess. (WHY, DIGNITY, WHYYYYY)




.....hm. I meant to use this post to talk about all the things that are happening in my life right now, but apparently those things are entirely comprised of "cycloplegia." So...hope you were wanting to learn about that, because we sure got that base covered today, huh
loquaciousquark: ((misc) eyes! eyes everywhere!)
I am cyclopleged!

I feel like this is worthy of notice because it's the only time they're going to do it to us while we're in school, and if they've decided that even as frequently as they dilate us that we only have to suffer cycloplegia once, then it's probably severe enough in its effects that it won't be a standard practice in an office. Plus, the sensation of being dilated is still enough of a novelty to me that I still find it entertaining to lose my near vision and have to wear reading glasses, although the sensitivity to light is a bum rap no matter how you play it. What. That is a perfectly reasonable metaphor. Shut up.

But all the same, this sucker is strong. Cycloplegia is basically a very strong, very long-acting dilator. It involves four different drops in each eye and it's designed to knock out all of a patient's accommodation for a long time, not just the little bit that regular dilation in an office does. The mix we used today was 1% cyclopentolate, 1% tropicamide, and 2.5% phenyl (the fourth drop was an anesthetic).

Anyway, the purpose, as stated, is to knock out all accommodation. This is mostly used for diagnosing little kids with really strong hyperopia. They're far-sighted, but their accommodation system can bring in their focus to the thing they're looking at, so the parents and the kids think they're seeing okay. But the problem is that their accommodation is having to work so hard to bring that focus in that they get horrible headaches and eye strain and burning, and sometimes their accommodation can even freeze up and they physically can't relax it, so we use the cycloplegia to knock out alllll that accommodation to see what they're actually seeing.

(One of the professors showed a slide in class today of a kid who got +0.25D OU on subjective refraction, which is a hyperopia so faint that it's almost nonexistent. But then, when the kid was cyclopleged and his accommodation was knocked out, the clinician discovered almost +4.50D latent hyperopia. FOUR FIFTY. THAT POOR KID.)

So our lab today was on cycloplegia. I was dropped at 9:50 this morning, and it's...almost six hours later, and my accommodation is juuuuust starting to come back so I can read at near distances. When I was first dropped, I lost my near vision up to four feet. Luckily, I'm just a high myope, so with my glasses I could still see distance and with the readers I could still manage to fill out my lab sheet. There were a couple unfortunate souls in my lab group who were latent hyperopes, and God bless them but they lost everything. One girl had to have her husband come pick her up because she couldn't drive.

And the thing about cycloplegia is that it lasts. so. long. The accommodation is usually busted for 8-12 hours, though it can last longer, and the dilation part of it lasts from 12-24 hours. THAT'S A DAY. A FULL DAY OF BEING DILATED. I drove home with two pairs of sunglasses and my readers on my nose and it still wasn't dark enough. (Although I will not lie, it was pretty hilarious to go down the pre-clinic rooms and see all these young people with reading glasses perched on the ends of their noses.)

And can I just say--these drops taste SO BAD? THEY TASTE SO BAD, YOU GUYS. I even did the whole nasolacrimal occlusion thing and it STILL ran down the back of my throat, and oh my goodness, ew. Now I feel even worse I dropped so much Fluress in one of my classmate's faces, because this stuff...it tastes disgusting.

Okay I just checked in the mirror and my pupils are blown so wide I look high. This explains why I got looks at the restaurant at lunch. (Okay, a 20-something fiddling with +2.50 readers to read the menu might have also been part of it.)(JADE WE WENT TO SALVATORE'S. I THOUGHT OF YOU.) Plus I think at that point I had my distance glasses and both pairs of sunglasses on my head, so. Huh. Things to consider in retrospect, I guess. (WHY, DIGNITY, WHYYYYY)




.....hm. I meant to use this post to talk about all the things that are happening in my life right now, but apparently those things are entirely comprised of "cycloplegia." So...hope you were wanting to learn about that, because we sure got that base covered today, huh
loquaciousquark: ((misc) eyes! eyes everywhere!)
7th-Sep-2011 10:08 pm - one day i will sleep forever
quark: hang on, jasper just came home
quark: i'm going to go say hi and retreat again
dustin: aka crawling out of your cave to hiss at the intruder then climb back into your recess
quark: halsjkhfahhahahahah

It's justified, though, I promise! I had a major CEVS lab practical Tuesday morning and I got about four hours of sleep the two days before it, and I still haven't quite recovered from that yet. I'd be asleep now if I wasn't waiting for JADE TO HURRY UP AND GET HOME, who grocery shops at 9:30 at night. Plus, I have this bad habit of plotting for my current WIPs as I fall asleep, and this latest DA2 fic I'm working on is giving me weird dreams. Not bad dreams, per se, just those really peculiar ones that leave you bewildered in the morning, faintly troubled by images of Fenris in a massive ballgown and a vague sense of haunting regret.



Also, check this out:


man that is a sweet ass-bike

I bought a bike! My old one was stolen a little over a year ago; I'd had it since I was about fifteen, though, so I wasn't overly heartbroken. I've been trying to exercise lately first thing as soon as I get home from school, even if it's only for twenty minutes at a time, and I prefer biking to most other forms of exercise; hence...bike.

Admittedly, it's been a while since I biked, but one thing has not changed in the slightest: I still look like a dadgum idiot in a helmet. WHY IS MY HEAD THE SIZE OF OLYMPUS MONS, WHY. oh the sacrifices we make to not die of coronary artery disease at 30


Auburn is going to be lucky to go 6-6 this year, holy cripes


And now, a picture of a stone rutabega with a face carved in it.


No, I don't know why, but sure as shootin there's a whole line of them.
loquaciousquark: ((sports) the best time of the year)
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